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Shipping Frozen Food Freight: Temps, Sanitization, & Traceability, The Cold Supply Chain Series Part 1

Shipping Frozen Food: The Ins, Outs, and Wherewithal

In this three part series around shipping frozen food freight, we will cover the ins and outs and best practices one must consider when shipping frozen food in order to stay compliant with the FDA's Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). In this post we will cover the temperatures best practices from origination to destination, sanitary provisions, and traceability of food and technology around traceability. Please let us know in the comment section at the end, your thoughts and additions to the below when shipping frozen food. When it comes to frozen food, this is often referred to as the Cold Chain. A

Temperatures for cold supply chain:

  • The required temperature is the responsibility of the exporter depending on the type of frozen food.  However, the customer may have temperature specifications as part of their purchase order/agreement.
  • Shipping Frozen Food General:  All frozen food must be held at an air temperature of 0 degrees F; the internal product temperature should not exceed 10 degrees F.
  • Vehicles should be pre-cooled to an air temperature of 20 degrees F, or lower before loading. Frozen food shipments will not be accepted for transportation when the internal product temperature exceeds 0 degrees.
  • The most common temperature standards are “banana” (13 degrees C), “Chill” (2 degrees C) and “Frozen” (-18 degrees C) and “Deep Frozen” (-29 degrees C). Staying within these temperatures is vital to the integrity of a shipment along the cold supply chain and for perishables it enables optimal shelf life. Any divergence can result in irrevocable and expensive damage (liability section).
  • The major cold chain technologies involve: dry ice, gel packs, plates (filled with liquids and can be used many times), liquid nitrogen quilts (insulated pieces that are placed over and around the freight to act as a buffer in temperature variations and to maintain the temperature relatively constant and reefers (temperature controlled container or truck).
  • The “last mile”:  A shipment going to its destination. Trucks and vans, the primary modes of transportation for this stage, must meet the specifications necessary to transfer the cold chain transportation for this stage.  Also important is the final transfer of the shipment into the storage facilities, as there is potential for breach of temperature integrity.
  • The forwarder advises the carrier of the ocean freight container the requested temperature setting at the time of booking the freight.
  • Prior to loading, the shipping line (or trucker) will pre-trip the reefer container. The reefer person will turn on and set the container to the proper temperature setting required by the exporter so that when it shows up for loading on the ocean vessel it will be at the exact temperature.
  • The shipping line has a meter that records the proper temperature during the duration of the trip.
  • You receive a read out from this meter with constant temperature graphs.
  • Carriers offer “protected” services at the port.  For a fee, the container yard /port/terminal will send a person out to check the fuel level of the reefer container and its functionality just to ensure nothing is wrong.

Sanitary Provisions when Shipping Frozen Food

  • All internal surfaces of vehicles and devises used for transporting frozen food shall be clean and free of objectionable odors before being loading with frozen food.shipping frozen food freight

Food traceability when Shipping Frozen Food

  • Produce (Food) Traceability Initiative (PTI) to enhance  traceability throughout the Food Supply Chain.
  • Solutions to marking cases and pallets to meet PTI requirements.
  • Steps to achieve traceability: Labeling and coding solutions: Laser coding and printer applications.
  • Includes a Global Trade Identification Number (GTIN) for traceability of food en route to the customer overseas.
  • Many other food companies are part of this initiative.
  • Each 3PL or Supplier who consolidates frozen food should have traceability software and labels available to meet the PTI.

Combination RFID and TRACEABILITY when Shipping Frozen Food

  • There is technology available to combine an RFID tag for Identification/traceability and temperature control.
  • The RFID with temperature indicator tag is a microchip combined with an antenna in a compact package.
  • The packing is structured to allow the RFID tag to be attached to an object to be tracked.  It also incorporates memory, a battery and clock to record sensor data in memory in constant intervals.
  • The 3PL and/or the Supplier may have this technology available.
  • 3PLs are combining the GPS and temp tags.

In the next part of this series about shipping frozen food freight, we will cover Quality Specifications and export documentation. Remember, if you have any thoughts, please let us know below!

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Chuck Intrieri

3PL Consultant at
Mr. Chuck Intrieri is a highly experienced and credentialed Supply Chain Management professional and is a recognized thought leader and innovator, primarily in the areas of Supply Chain Optimization, LEAN initiatives, Operations, Manufacturing, Third Party Logistics (3PL) International Purchasing/Importing, Inventory Management and Logistics, Strategic Sourcing, and Procurement Operations.
Chuck Intrieri

Chuck Intrieri

Chuck Intrieri
  • Pingback: Cold Chain Logistics: Quality Specifications and Export Documentation()

  • Wood pallets are a conduit for transmission of bacterial contamination and the FSMA recommends food be transported on a non-porous pallet. That makes an aluminum pallet the perfect choice. Plus, it can have weight and temperature change sensors included right on the pallet. I-pallets, Inc. specializes in cost-effective, customized pallet solutions. Check them out. .

  • Pingback: Cold Supply Chain: Liability & Label and Marking Considerations()

  • Andrew Jordan

    In the USA there is no objection to shipping any kind of product on wood pallets. This only comes into play when shipping to EEC countries and there are technologies to sterilize wood pallets to meet these requirements. As we say in Texas I don’t have a dog in this hunt but most shippers I know aren’t going to ship on Aluminum or Plastic in a non returnable situation. You can only justify that kind of outlay in a closed loop shipping situation.

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